Champion Athletes is excited to be offering the cutting edge in injury prevention and flexibility training, PNF Stretching.

Champion Athletes’ Flexibility Enhancement Program is specifically designed to meet the needs of the athlete where flexibility and power are paramount to their success.   Increased flexibility combined with strength training has been proven to be the single best way to prevent injuries in competitive sports.

Each treatment session consists of a combination of heat, sports massage and PNF (proprioceptive neuro- muscular facilitation) stretching.  Each muscle group and joint is first warmed and then treated with muscular vibration and massage.  This places the joint and associated muscles and structures in the ideal state to benefit the most from the PNF treatment.  PNF stretching (or proprioceptive neuro-muscular facilitation) is one of the most effective forms of flexibility training for increasing range of motion (1,2).

PNF techniques can be both passive (no associated muscular contraction) or active (voluntary muscle contraction). While there are several variations of PNF stretching, they all have one thing in common – they facilitate muscular inhibition. It is believed that this is why PNF is superior to other forms of flexibility training (1,2,3,4).

“When Dan started stretching me I was in chronic pain.  My lower back was hurt and my shoulders ached every day.  I felt relief right away and now (3 months later) I am pain free and have doubled my flexibilty! I am also much stronger in positions (wrestling) that I used to be very weak in.” -Steve Ramos 2009 3rd Place NYS Wrestling Championships, NC State Scholarship Wrestler.

To find out more about PNF Stretching or to schedule an evaluation call:

845-641-3063 ask for Dan

FAQ:

Q: How much flexilbity will I gain?

A: How much an individual will benefit from this program depends on their dedication, base starting level as well as frequency of training.  Therefore it is hard to put a specific value on how “much” flexibilty you will gain.  In gerneral most people experience an increase of at least 50% in their tightest areas in 6 weeks and 100% improvement at 12 weeks.

Q: How long will each session take?  How long will I have to do it for?

A: An individual session typically lasts for one hour.  Depending on your reason for coming as well as your starting level your program may run for a couple of weeks or several months.  Many people chose to continue the treatment year round.  We do provide individuals with maintence programs to continue at home if they are unable to continue the program for any reason.

Q: What can I expect from a typical session?

A: You will get undressed into shorts or your boxers.  Women are asked to wear tank tops or sports bras as well as shorts or sports shorts.  You will then lay on a massage table where heating pads will be applied the muscles that are going to be targeted.  Then a vibratory massage is applied to all of the muscles that are to be stretched.  Then approximately 20 minutes of actual stretching will occur.  If necessary ice massages and electric stimulation may be applied to injuries or problem areas.

Q: How much does this program cost?

A: Each program is customized for each individual.  Based on the needs on the individual and the number of sessions purchased a price is arranged.  A typical hour will cost around $50 depending on the number of session purchased.  In addition, family or team discounts as well as referrel discounts are available.

 Testimonials:

“When Dan started stretching me I was in chronic pain.  My lower back was hurt and my shoulders ached every day.  I felt relief right away and now (3 months later) I am pain free and have doubled my flexibilty! I am also much stronger in positions (wrestling) that I used to be very week in.” -Steven Ramos 2009 3rd Place NYS Wrestling Championships, NC State Scholarship Wrestler.

“When I first started with Champion Athletes I had a severe groin pull.  I had to be moved to defense because I couldn’t run the length of the field.  I tried everything and nothing worked.  Within two weeks Champion Athletes had me playing offense and feeling great.  I finished the season feeling better than I had ever felt on the field before.” -Brian Clifford, CHS-NY Lacross Player, Penn. State University.

“For years I had severe back pain.  After years of chiropractic treatments and physical therapy I was beginning to think my back would never feel better.  After just a couple of sessions with Dan at Champion Athletes I was able to move better than I had in years.  I am very greatful to everyone at Champion Athletes.” Cameron McLauren, Washingtonville HS, NY-Football and Wrestling Captain, University of Buffalo Wrestler

“Thanks to Champion Athletes I am more fleixible than I have ever been.  I feel faster on the ice and have had far fewer injuries since I started training with them.  I also bounce back faster from work outs and games.  Thanks guys.”  –David Gerity, Bergen Catholic High School Hockey and Lacross Player

“After Nationals I had to have knee surgery.  My knee was very week after surgery and I had a lot of pain because I had become inflexible in that leg.  Dan helped me rehab my knee and increased my flexibilty.  Now I feel confident that I can win DIII Nationals this year.” -Alex Moreno, Stevens Institute of Technology Wrestler

 More information on how PNF Stretching works:

Both isometric and concentric muscle actions completed immediately before the passive stretch help to achieve autogenic inhibition- a reflex relaxation that occurs in the same muscle where the golgi tendon organ is stimulated. Often the isometric contraction is referred to as ‘hold’ and the concentric muscle contraction is referred to as ‘contract’.
A similar technique involves concentrically contracting the opposing muscle group to that being stretched in order to achieve reciprocal inhibition- a reflex muscular relaxation that occurs in the muscle that is opposite the muscle where the golgi tendon organ is stimulated.
Using these techniques of ‘contracting’, ‘holding’ and passive stretching (often referred to as ‘relax’) results in three PNF stretching techniques. Each technique, although slightly different, involves starting with a passive stretch held for about 10 seconds.
For clarity and to compare each technique, think of a hamstring stretch in the supine (on back, face up) position for each example. The athlete places one leg extended, flat on the floor and the other extended in the air as close to right angles to the body as possible.
Hold-Relax
A partner moves the athletes extended leg to a point of mild discomfort. This passive stretch is held for 10 seconds.
On instruction, the athlete isometrically contracts the hamstrings by pushing their extended leg against their partner’s hand. The partner should apply just enough force so that the leg remains static. This is the ‘hold’ phase and lasts for 6 seconds.
The athlete is then instructed to ‘relax’ and the partner completes a second passive stretch held for 30 seconds. The athlete’s extended leg should move further than before (greater hip flexion) due to autogenic inhibition activated in the hamstrings.
Contract-Relax
A partner moves the athlete’s extended leg to a point of mild discomfort. This passive stretch is held for 10 seconds.
On instruction, the athlete concentrically contracts the hamstrings by pushing their extended leg against their partner’s hand. The partner should apply enough force so that there is resistance while allowing the athlete to push their leg to the floor (i.e. through the full range of motion). This is the ‘contract’ phase.
The athlete is then instructed to ‘relax’ and the partner completes a second passive stretch held for 30 seconds. The athlete’s extended leg should move further than before (greater hip flexion) due to autogenic inhibition activated in the hamstrings.
Hold-Relax with Opposing Muscle Contraction
A partner moves the athlete’s extended leg to a point of mild discomfort. This passive stretch is held for 10 seconds.
On instruction, the athlete isometrically contracts the hamstrings by pushing their extended leg against their partner’s hand. The partner should apply just enough force so that the leg remains static. This is the ‘hold’ phase and lasts for 6 seconds. This initiates autogenic inhibition.
The partner completes a second passive stretch held for 30 seconds, however the athlete is instructed to flex the hip (i.e. pull the leg in the same direction as it is being pushed). This initiates reciprocal inhibition allowing the final stretch to be greater.
 
References
1) Cornelius, W.J. and M.M. Hinson. The relationship between isometric contractions and of hip extensors and subsequent flexibility in males. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness. 20:75-80. 1980
2)Holt, L.E., T.M. Travis, and T. Okia. Comparative study of three stretching techniques. Percept. Mot. Skills. 31:611-16. 1970
3)Sady, S.P., M. Wortman, and D. Blanke. Flexibility Training: Ballistic, static or proprioceptive muscular facilitation? Arch. Phys. Med Rehabil.63:261-63. 1982
4)Tanigawa, M.C. Comparison of the hold relax procedure and passive mobilization on increasing muscle length. Phys. Ther. 52:725-35. 1972